Pantothentic acid aids in synthesizing coenzyme-A, proteins, carbohydrates and fats.

As a water-soluble vitamin, B5 can be lost in the process of cooking. In addition, it may be reduced or eliminated by alkaline foods such as vinegar. Since it cannot be stored by the body, it must be consumed regularly.

VITAMIN B5 PROVIDES SUPPORT TO

  • Cholesterol synthesis
  • Conversion of food to energy
  • Digestion
  • Efficient use of vitamin B2
  • Neurotransmitters and hormone production/regulation
  • Production of red blood cells

RECOMMENDED DAILY ALLOWANCE (RDA)

  • For adults – 5 mg/day
  • For pregnant women – 5 mg/day
  • For lactating women – 7 mg/day
  • Safe upper limit is unknown (no study data for adverse effects)

DISEASE CONDITIONS ASSOCIATED WITH A DEFICIENCY OF VITAMIN B5

Deficiencies are rare. There is a little bit of this nutrient in most foods.

  • Adrenal insufficiency
  • Apathy
  • Fatigue
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Insulin sensitivity
  • Muscle cramps
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Numbness
  • Sleep disturbances

HEALTH CONDITIONS ASSOCIATED WITH TOXICITY (too much)

  • No known toxicity from high doses

RISK FACTORS (Conditions or behaviors that increase the risk of deficiencies)

  • Deficiencies are quite rare except in cases of severe malnourishment.

BEST SOURCES OF VITAMIN B5

  • Rice bran
  • Animal liver
  • Dried whey
  • Caviar
  • Shitake mushrooms
  • Chicken giblets
  • Spirulina
  • Wheat bran
  • Sun-dried tomatoes
  • Avocado
  • Eggs
  • Tuna
  • Cashews, dry roasted
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Sprouted peas
  • Flax seeds
SHARE